Cannabis Extracts May Extend the Life of Bees Exposed to Pesticides, Research Shows

Cannabis Extracts May Extend the Life of Bees Exposed to Pesticides, Research Shows

Original Post: Merry Jane: Cannabis Extracts May Extend the Life of Bees Exposed to Pesticides, Research Shows

WOW! Another potentially great use for cannabis. We’ve lost almost 100 years of research because of the racist prohibition of cannabis. Now our societies around the globe are beginning to find through research that there is a wonderful, fairly easy to grow plant that can benefit all of us in innumerable ways. Why am I not surprised.

Original Post: Merry Jane: Cannabis Extracts May Extend the Life of Bees Exposed to Pesticides, Research Shows

Cannabis Use Among Seniors Rises in Popularity

Cannabis Use Among Seniors Rises in Popularity

Original Post: High Times: Cannabis Use Among Seniors Rises in Popularity

Of course cannabis use is up among seniors. It helps mitigate all the aches and pains of getting older and there are aches and pains. Whether it’s arthritis, digestive issues, or many other common ailments that age brings to humans, cannabis can help alleviate those old age symptoms. So toke away seniors Toke away!

Read more…

Cannabis Use Among Seniors Rises in Popularity was posted on High Times.

The Secret to Better Cannabis Highs? Eat Your Broccoli (and these other high-enhancing foods)

The Secret to Better Cannabis Highs? Eat Your Broccoli (and these other high-enhancing foods)

Original article was posted on Green State: The Secret to Better Cannabis Highs? Eat Your Broccoli (and these other high-enhancing foods)

(Photo by: Anjelika Gretskaia/REDA&CO/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

Canniseur: Sometimes it helps to like and/or love veggies. I know I love broccoli and am extremely happy to now know that it can make my high, uh, higher! So if you remember what your mother told you as in; “Eat Your Veggies!” was a good thing, then you’ll apparently have happy days ahead.

The post The secret to better cannabis highs? Eat your broccoli (and these other high-enhancing foods) appeared first on GreenState.

Original article was posted on Green State: The Secret to Better Cannabis Highs? Eat Your Broccoli (and these other high-enhancing foods)

Broad Spectrum CBD for Athletes: The Cannabidiol Effect

Broad Spectrum CBD for Athletes: The Cannabidiol Effect

In the last few years, broad spectrum CBD burst onto the athletic scene at an astounding rate. A decade ago, products such as CBD salve were rare. You could only buy them in states with legal medical marijuana. Today, hemp is right at everyone’s fingertips and just a few taps away online. As it became more widely available and mainstream, many professional and amateur athletes’ testimonials arose on the benefits and relief that hemp offered them. Conclusive scientific studies are still in-progress. However, early evidence shows that thanks to the cannabidiol effect, broad spectrum CBD may provide many potential benefits that can help athletes perform better and recover faster.

 

What is Broad Spectrum CBD?

CBD is a molecule found within the cannabis plant. The cannabis plant, or Cannabis sativa, is the overarching term for the plant that produces all hemp, CBD, and marijuana products. The distinction between the different types of cannabis plants determines their legality, benefits, and use. Cannabis plants contain a combination of cannabinoids such as:

  • CBD, or cannabidiol
  • THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol
  • Terpenes, such as limonene

In total, scientists have identified over 150 cannabinoids and terpenes within the cannabis plant. CBD is known to be one of the most beneficial and common cannabinoids, and is the main beneficial molecule extracted from hemp plants. CBD binds with natural receptors in your body. While scientists are still studying the effects, preliminary studies and testimonials are showing promise in many areas.

In 2018, the US Government decriminalized industrial hemp with a THC content of less than 0.3%. However, broad spectrum and full spectrum CBD salve are not legal in all states. Full spectrum CBD oil has up to the legal limit of THC and also contains beneficial terpenes. Broad spectrum CBD contains no THC, and is great for anyone who is not comfortable with small amounts of THC.

The Cannabidiol Effect

CBD works by binding with the natural cannabinoid receptors in your body’s endocrine system. Everyone is born with these receptors, and our bodies actually make cannabinoids on their own. CBD mimics these natural cannabinoids, and fits perfectly into the receptors in the endocrine system. Once bound, CBD causes the body to send hormonal signals throughout the body. Again, the benefits of CBD are yet to be conclusively proven, but scientific research and testimonials claim that CBD might be:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Pain relieving
  • Regenerative
  • Anti-viral/anti-bacterial

It is easy to imagine the numerous potential benefits that those properties can offer to athletes. When taken on a regular basis or as needed, CBD may assist with preventing serious injury, improve energy and endurance, and help athletes recover from activity and/or energy.

How To Take CBD

Whether you are using broad spectrum CBD or full spectrum CBD, you can find a variety of products to fit your needs. CBD oil or capsules        can be taken daily, and CBD roll on can be applied directly to the area of issue. How much CBD to take depends on your pain level, your weight, and your intended results.

What is broad spectrum CBD?

CBD is a molecule found within the cannabis plant. The cannabis plant, or Cannabis sativa, is the overarching term for the plant that produces all hemp, CBD, and marijuana products. The distinction between the different types of cannabis plants determines their legality, benefits, and use. Cannabis plants contain a combination of cannabinoids such as:

  • CBD, or cannabidiol
  • THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol
  • Terpenes, such as limonene

In total, scientists have identified over 100 cannabinoids within the cannabis plant. CBD is known to be one of the most beneficial and common cannabinoids, and is the main beneficial molecule extracted from hemp plants. CBD binds with natural receptors in your body, and while scientists are still studying the effects, preliminary studies and testimonials are showing promise in many areas.

 

In 2018, the US Government decriminalized industrial hemp with a THC content of less than 0.3% but broad spectrum and full spectrum CBD salve are not legal in all states. Full spectrum CBD oil has up to the legal limit of THC and also contains beneficial terpenes. Broad spectrum CBD contains no THC, and is great for anyone who is not comfortable with small amounts of THC.

The Cannabidiol Effect

CBD works by binding with the natural cannabinoid receptors in your body’s endocrine system. Everyone is born with these receptors, and our bodies actually make cannabinoids on their own. CBD mimics these natural cannabinoids, and fits perfectly into the receptors in the endocrine system. Once bound, CBD causes the body to send hormonal signals throughout the body. Again, the benefits of CBD are yet to be conclusively proven, but scientific research and testimonials claim that CBD might be:

  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Pain relieving
  • Regenerative
  • Anti-viral/anti-bacterial

It is easy to imagine the numerous potential benefits that those properties can offer to athletes. When taken on a regular basis or as needed, CBD may assist with preventing serious injury, improve energy and endurance, and help athletes recover from activity and/or energy.

How To Take CBD

Whether you are using broad spectrum CBD or full spectrum CBD, you can find a variety of products to fit your needs. CBD oil or capsules can be taken daily, and cbd roll on can be applied directly to the area of issue. How much CBD to take depends on your pain level, your weight, and your intended results.

Meta: Thanks to the cannabidiol effect, broad spectrum CBD mimics natural effects in the body that may help athletes with performance and recovery issues.

Need Another Reason Not to Vape? Your Oral Health is at Risk

Need Another Reason Not to Vape? Your Oral Health is at Risk

Original article was posted on Green State: Need Another Reason Not to Vape? Your Oral Health is at Risk

(Photo by Richard Baker / In Pictures via Getty Images)

[Canniseur: Although this is primarily about nicotine vaping, many of the same caveats apply to cannabis vaping from cartridges. Yet another reason why I don’t like to vape cannabis from a cartridge. If it’s concentrate and you’re spiking, that’s a very different story. You should be inhaling pure (or purer) THC.]

The warnings about vaping – inhaling the vapor of electronic cigarettes – tend to focus on the potential dangers to the heart and lungs.

But an increasing amount of research shows the chemicals in e-cigarettes start to inflict damage right where they enter the body: your mouth.

Because e-cigarettes are a recent phenomenon, said Dr. Crystal Stinson, assistant professor at Texas A&M College of Dentistry in Dallas, “Studies on their impact are really new. But now we have a solid amount of evidence that shows the link between e-cigarettes and poor oral health.”

Nicotine, whether smoked or vaped, restricts blood flow to the gums, which can contribute to periodontal disease. The fluid in e-cigarettes, which can include propylene glycol, benzene, formaldehyde and other chemicals, only increases the risks.

A study published earlier this year in the journal iScience showed that 43% of people using e-cigarettes had gum disease and oral infections. That figure was higher among smokers – 73% – but only 28% among people who neither smoked nor vaped.

“The oral cavity is really resilient tissue that heals faster than other parts of the body,” Stinson said. “But we also know that when you repeatedly traumatize it, that’s when you end up having issues that are irreversible.”

Those issues, she added, range from inflammation and tooth cavities to loss of bone that anchors teeth to the jaw, called periodontitis, and oral cancer.

Another study published in May in Science Advances concluded the oral microbiome – the vast collection of friendly bacteria, viruses and other microbes that live in the mouth – of e-cigarette users without gum disease looked a lot like the microbiome of people with periodontitis.

“It’s absolutely scary stuff,” said Dr. Purnima Kumar, professor at the Ohio State University College of Dentistry and the study’s senior author. “E-cigarettes stress the bacterial communities that live in your mouth, and they encase themselves in slime. So they’re no longer good bacteria and the inflammatory response is through the roof. People are walking around thinking they’re healthy, but they are just primed for disease.”

Oral health is a critical element of whole-body health. Two preliminary studies presented in February at the American Stroke Association’s International Stroke Conference linked gum disease with a higher rate of strokes caused by hardening of large arteries in the brain and also with severe artery blockages. A 2018 study in the American Heart Association journal Hypertension found that gum disease appears to worsen high blood pressure and interferes with medications to treat hypertension.

Last December, the American Dental Association issued a statement urging a ban on e-cigarettes not approved by the Food and Drug Administration to help people quit smoking, as well as more research on the effects of vaping on oral health.

“We’ve just scratched the surface,” Kumar said. “We know it’s detrimental. We need to start looking at which chemical components of vape really cause this, why does it cause this, how long does it take to start, and how long does the body need to recover once you quit.”

Not enough time has passed since vaping became popular to assess the long-term dangers, Stinson said. “Unfortunately, everybody’s an experiment right now.”

But Stinson doesn’t need to wait for more studies to be convinced of the dangers of vaping. One look inside a vaper’s mouth usually tells the story.

“Periodontal disease is normally an adult disease, and we’re seeing it in younger people,” she said. “Younger people normally have more saliva than they need, so when they present with dry mouth, periodontal disease or increased complaints of mouth ulcers, our next question is, ‘Do you vape?’ These symptoms are all tied to components in e-cigarettes.”

She also notices more cavities in her younger patients who vape, which she believes may be due to the acidity of the components in vape liquid and an increase in cavity-causing bacteria.

Stinson attributes the high rate of nicotine dependence to the sweet flavorings that helped attract adolescents to e-cigarettes. In February, the FDA banned many flavored e-cigarettes in hopes of reducing the rise in vaping among young people, but health experts fear many are already hooked on nicotine.

“Phasing out the flavors is going to help, but we still have a population that is struggling to let go of the habit,” she said.

Both Stinson and Kumar are involved in education and cessation programs aimed at convincing young people not to start vaping and helping those who do to stop.

The first lesson: Don’t be fooled into thinking that what looks like steam is a safe alternative to cigarette smoke.

“You hear ‘vapor’ and you think steam facials or a tea kettle,” Kumar said. “It’s not a vapor. It’s an aerosol, like hairspray or what you use to kill ants and cockroaches. When I teach young kids, I take little cans of hairspray and say, ‘I want you to spray this in your mouth.’

“They say, ‘Ew, no.’ So, I say, ‘Then why would you vape?’”

If you have questions or comments about this story, please email editor@heart.org.

American Heart Association News covers heart disease, stroke and related health issues. Not all views expressed in American Heart Association News stories reflect the official position of the American Heart Association.

Copyright is owned or held by the American Heart Association, Inc., and all rights are reserved. Permission is granted, at no cost and without need for further request, to link to, quote, excerpt or reprint from these stories in any medium as long as no text is altered and proper attribution is made to the American Heart Association News. See full terms of use.

HEALTH CARE DISCLAIMER: This site and its services do not constitute the practice of medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always talk to your health care provider for diagnosis and treatment, including your specific medical needs. If you have or suspect that you have a medical problem or condition, please contact a qualified health care professional immediately. If you are in the United States and experiencing a medical emergency, call 911 or call for emergency medical help immediately.

The post Need another reason not to vape? Your oral health is at risk appeared first on GreenState.

Original article was posted on Green State: Need Another Reason Not to Vape? Your Oral Health is at Risk

American Heart Association Says Weed Is Bad for Your Health, Then Calls to Reschedule It

American Heart Association Says Weed Is Bad for Your Health, Then Calls to Reschedule It

Original Post: Merry Jane: American Heart Association Says Weed Is Bad for Your Health, Then Calls to Reschedule It

[Canniseur: It would seem that the American Heart Association is making statements without any real scientific research and at the same time saying that cannabis should be removed from Schedule 1. There’s a small(?) disconnect here, but I’m thinking they’ve got a higher concept about what they’re doing.]

Earlier this week, the American Heart Association (AHA) reportedly made two public statements regarding marijuana that seemed to contradict each other — sort of.

First came a claim that smoking weed is dangerous to cardiovascular health and should be avoided. At the same time, however, the AHA called for cannabis to be removed as a Schedule 1 drug so that scientists can research it freely.

It’s difficult not to interpret the underlying message of these apparently disparate stances as: “Weed is bad for your overall health, but it’s a good way for us to get more money so we can conduct more studies to show that cannabis is bad.”

Usually organizations like to hide the fact they have an agenda. But, let’s look at the individual statements and try to keep our heart rates in check.

Following a study published Wednesday in the journal Circulation, Dr. Rose Marie Robertson, the AHA’s deputy chief science and medical officer, said in a statement, “People who use cannabis need to know there are potentially serious health risks in smoking or vaping it, just like tobacco smoke. The American Heart Association recommends that people not smoke or vape any substance, including cannabis products, because of the potential harm to the heart, lungs and blood vessels.”

The study itself reportedly found “no cardiovascular benefits” in ingesting weed and claims that doing so may “trigger cardiovascular conditions or events, such as heart attacks and strokes.”

Addressing those alleged concerns, an AHA writing group led by clinical physician Robert Page II suggested that if people use cannabis medicinally or recreationally in measured doses, particularly in the oral and topical forms, some of the potential harms could be reduced.

Page’s group statement also called for regulators to standardize THC and CBD concentrations in legal weed and — in a potential move that might directly benefit the AHA — declared that cannabis should be rescheduled so more government funds can be directed toward its research.

“We urgently need carefully designed, prospective short- and long-term studies regarding cannabis use and cardiovascular safety as it becomes increasingly available and more widely used,” Page stated. “Research funding at federal and state levels must be increased to match the expansion of cannabis use.”

Did everybody catch that last part about “research funding… must be increased”?

Don’t get us wrong: We obviously need more research on cannabis, and we want it rescheduled (but descheduling might be better!). It’s just hard to trust an organization that uses its “findings” to release blanket statements such as “Weed is bad.” It doesn’t seem like the AHA is interested in genuine reform that will mend the wrongs of the Drug War by clearing recordings, pardoning convictions, and granting clemency to people sitting behind bars for a plant that is legal in some form across the majority of the US.

Sure, smoking anything can have adverse effects on our health. But, numerous studies have already demonstrated the myriad benefits of marijuana when it comes to cardiovascular well-being and other health issues, particularly when cannabis is ingested orally.

One 2018 study from the University of Colorado concluded that weed users have a better chance of surviving a heart attack. A University of Mississippi Medical Center study published this past June also found no evidence whatsoever linking to an increased risk of strokes.

In other studies, hypertension patients saw a drop in blood pressure after using weed and researchers noted positive effects of cannabis on mice in slowing the progress of atherosclerosis and offering protection against chronic chronic heart failure.

The American Heart Association may have their own agenda in calling for rescheduling, but so do we: Legalize weed now because weed is good for you, and the Drug War is a racist fallacy designed to oppress Black and people of color.

Original Post: Merry Jane: American Heart Association Says Weed Is Bad for Your Health, Then Calls to Reschedule It

5 Benefits of CBD for Insomnia

5 Benefits of CBD for Insomnia

[Canniseur: CBD helps if you have insomnia. I know this from experience. It’s also quasi-legal in most states. There are still a few places where you don’t want people to know you’re ingesting CBD leaf, oil, concentrate. It works and works well. Better than many other things you might ingest to help you get the sleep you need. Read why here.]

By Andy Coffaro

Cannabidiol (CBD) is gaining public steam like a locomotive chugging down a mountainside. Consumers are increasingly using it in everything from iced coffees to easy-to-swallow gel caps. You can even soak in an evening bath swirling with CBD-soothing salts.

CBD has a laundry list of benefits ranging from muscle recovery to anxiety relief, but did you know it can help with your insomnia?

Neuroscientist and Why We Sleep author Matthew Walker has dedicated his life to educating the public about the benefits of sleep. From instilling the importance of eight hours of nightly snoozing to advice like keeping your bedroom around 65 degrees, there’s no shortage of expert advice on how to fall and stay in a blissful state of slumber.

But along with Walker’s time-honored tips, how can CBD help you fall asleep quicker and hibernate for the night versus tossing and turning?

1. How CBD Promotes Better Sleep

While there is still much research to be done, initial studies believe that cannabinoids interact with specific receptors within the endocannabinoid system to alleviate disruptive sleep factors like pain and anxiety.

2. CBD Products

Sleep-inducing cannabidiols are available in a wide variety of products, so spend some time researching what might work best. Here are some popular and under-the-radar options to explore:

  • Edibles: Don’t worry, these aren’t the THC-laced brownies and cookies you see in comedy movies or memes. Edibles are available as gummy bears, peanut butter cups, and oodles of additional options with CBD concentrations listed in milligrams.
  • Vaping: Convenient and discrete vape pens are great alternatives to its messy flower counterpart.
  • Tinctures: Simply add a few drops to your favorite beverage, including non-caffeinated “sleepy time” teas in the evening.
  • Bath salts: Studies have shown that taking warm baths at night can help you fall asleep faster, so tossing in a generous handful of CBD bath salts can help even more.

3. Don’t Count Sheep, Count Milligrams

In the same way your body might react differently to prescribed medications or a single glass of wine compared to others, there’s no exact science when it comes to taking CBD. While it may take trial and error to discover how many milligrams of CBD provide you with restful sleep, it’s always smart to adhere to the adage, “You can always take more, but you can’t take less.”

4. When to Take CBD before Jumping Into Bed

Similar to using trial and error to determine the right milligram strength, the time it takes for CBD products to kick-in varies as well. Generally speaking, most packaging purports anywhere from 15 to 90 minutes for it to take effect.

5. Convenience

Unlike its THC counterpart, CBD items containing THC below 0.3% by weight can not only be purchased and shipped anywhere in the continental United States, but also you can throw it in your bag when traveling to combat sleep issues far from home.

Preview(opens in a new tab)

While CBD can help alleviate your insomnia in dozens of additional ways, these five tips can help propel you to vastly improved slumber as soon as tonight.

The post 5 Benefits of CBD for Insomnia appeared first on The Cannifornian.

5 Benefits of CBD for Insomnia was posted on the cannifornian com.

5 Benefits of CBD for Muscle Recovery

5 Benefits of CBD for Muscle Recovery

[Canniseur: While I believe the information about CBD, the real problem with it is there’s no way to tell if you’re getting real CBD. There are so many fake products in the marketplace now, that it’s truly hard to discern what is what out there. Until cannabis is removed from Schedule 1, there will be no way to tell because there is no governing body that will certify that the CBD you’re buying is really CBD.]

When Sal, a personal fitness trainer, started upping her workout game, she noticed she was having trouble recovering from workouts, often finding herself in pain for extended recovery times. Knowing that strenuous workouts can cause post-workout pain due to inflammation of the muscles, Sal decided to look into alternative medicine methods for muscle recovery. She had heard about how CBD can reduce pain in fibromyalgia patients and wondered if it would work for post-workout muscle pain. It turns out that CBD can reduce post-workout inflammation and pain, giving you faster recovery times.

What is CBD?

CBD, which stands for cannabidiol, is the second most active ingredient in cannabis (marijuana). THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the first. As an essential component of medical marijuana, CBD derives from the hemp plant. The hemp plant is a cousin of the marijuana plant. Even though CBD is an element of marijuana (it’s just one among hundreds), it does not cause a psychoactive “high” as THC does. But, it does have many medicinal and healing benefits, including muscle recovery.

In a 2018 review of 132 published studies in Frontiers in Neurology, researchers proved that CBD decreases inflammation and improves mobility and pain in patients with multiple sclerosis. CBD’s antipsychotic, antiemetic, neuroprotective, antioxidative, and anti-inflammatory characteristics help reduce inflammation and pain. The review’s findings suggest that people with post-workout inflammation and pain can also benefit from CBD.

How Do You Take CBD?

CBD is taken in several ways, including by ingesting it, inhaling it, or applying it to the skin. The various forms of CBD are edibles, pills, concentrates, flowers, or topicals. Since CBD is marketed as a supplement and not a medicine, the FDA does not regulate it. The FDA does not oversee the safety and purity of supplements. That said, it is difficult to determine just how much CBD you should take for muscle recovery. It may take some time to adjust your dosage to what your body requires for muscle recovery. One thing is for sure, when you take CBD and how you take it affects your recovery. For post-workout recovery, you must take CBD immediately after your workout. And, it should be in the form of ingestion.  One of the best ways to ingest CBD is with chewy CBD gummies. CBD from the authorized marijuana dispensary is highly effective and provides longer-lasting effects.

5 Health Benefits of CBD for Post-Workout Recovery

There are over 14,000 published medical and scientific studies proving the health benefits of CBD. And, they found five specific benefits of CBD for muscle recovery.

  1. CBD Can Reduce Muscle Inflammation. CBD can help reduce inflammation, making it a critical component to post-workout recovery, and applying ice to prevent or reduce inflammation after a workout is not enough. Those who are working out strenuously or are athletes need more. That is where CBD comes into play. By inhaling, ingesting, or applying it to the skin, you can reduce inflammation that has already occurred, giving you faster recovery time. According to studies, CBD inhibits some inflammatory molecules, therefore shortening recovery time and relieving tension and inflammation in the tissue.
  1. CBD Might Decrease Muscle Tension. Post-workout muscle tension is usually an indicator that there is an injury to a tissue. If this has ever happened to you, you know how painful it can be. So painful that you need to take something to help reduce the pain. Most athletes turn to muscle relaxers for this type of pain. But, muscle relaxers are benzodiazepine drugs that have side effects like depression, trembling, dizziness, confusion, and sedation. CBD, on the other hand, is not known to produce any side effects and is all-natural. CBD is beneficial for treating post-workout muscle tension.
  1. CBD Can Help Reduce Pain. CBD is thought of as a miracle painkiller. A natural alternative, CBD can reduce pain through three mechanisms by stopping pain transmission in the brain and spinal cord, decreasing inflammatory messenger activity, and reducing muscle ache sensitivity.
  1. CBD Can Improve Sleep. Sleep is essential to your health, including muscle recovery. With quality sleep, you can improve your fitness level because muscles recover while you sleep. The body goes through many processes during sleep, including restoring damaged proteins, removing cellular debris, converting lactic acid to glucose in the liver, and stimulating stem cell differentiation into muscle fibers. On the other hand, sleep deprivation can boost cortisol levels, decrease the insulin-like growth factor, and reduce testosterone production. CBD can help these processes, resulting in better quality sleep.

Insomnia is prevalent and is associated with increased health risks. A May 2020 study revealed how cannabinoids help improve sleep in patients with chronic insomnia disorder. And, as believed, subjects found improved sleep after taking a pharmaceutical-grade oral oil solution containing 10mg of Delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and 200mg cannabidiol (CBD). The study does not address how much THC is affecting sleep quality.

5. CBD Can Improve Energy Levels. For fitness lovers and athletes, being low in energy can be detrimental. It could be the result of many reasons, including some medical conditions, so it is a good idea to see your doctor first. CBD works in conjunction with the body’s endocannabinoid system with its cannabinoids that help restore and manage a natural balance or homeostasis in your body. This process allows for steady, increased energy.

With these five health benefits of CBD for muscle recovery, you can improve your fitness level and quality of workouts. If added as a supplement, you may notice faster muscle recovery with every workout.

The post 5 Benefits of CBD for Muscle Recovery appeared first on The Cannifornian.

5 Benefits of CBD for Muscle Recovery was posted on the cannifornian com.

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