Vireo Health Launches 1937 Cannabis Brand

Vireo Health Launches 1937 Cannabis Brand

Original Post: CFN Media Group: Vireo Health Launches 1937 Cannabis Brand

[Canniseur: Interesting name. 1937 was the year that cannabis was first banned in the U.S. The company advertises that they are featuring historic cannabis strains. Um, no they’re not. Bubba Kush and Sweet Cheese are not the landrace (original) strains that they are purported to be. The story goes on to state that they use a long curing process, etc. I’d sure like to see this cannabis. If companies continue this kind of undocumented hype, they’ll hurt many other companies trying to grow special products.]

1937 Cannabis features historic cannabis strains and will be available in both dry flower and concentrates

MINNEAPOLIS, Oct. 17, 2019 /PRNewswire/ — Vireo Health International, Inc. (“Vireo” or the “Company”) (CNSX: VREO; OTCQX: VREOF), a leading physician-founded, science-focused multi-state cannabis company, today announced the launch of 1937 Cannabis, a new brand of professional grade cannabis-based products. 1937 Cannabis represents the Company’s first launch of a new cannabis brand and first time offering dry flower. The 1937 Cannabis product line features dry flower and will expand to include concentrates later this year.

1937 Cannabis (www.1937cannabis.com) is now available in dispensaries throughout Pennsylvania and Maryland and features legendary strains such as ‘Bubba Kush’ and ‘Sweet Cheese’ that are handpicked and hand-packaged to assure only the best flower is utilized. The flower is cured for extended time periods to create a smoother taste, enhanced terpene profile, and deeper aromatics. 1937 Cannabis is 100% pesticide free and sold in premium, airtight glass jars.

“We are excited to announce the launch of 1937, a new line of premium-quality cannabis products,” said CEO and Founder Kyle Kingsley, MD. “By expanding our product lines to include dry flower, we are increasing access and affordability, while providing our customers – both cannabis connoisseurs and medical patients alike – with new choices and opportunities to discover which products best meet their individual needs.”

“Vireo is developing a strong portfolio of brands that engage and delight both recreation and medical consumers,” added Harris Rabin Chief Marketing Officer of Vireo Health. “1937 is our second major brand, but we are creating and launching a variety of exciting, new brands for every occasion our customers have to enjoy cannabis products.”

The brand name, 1937, is a reference to The Marihuana Tax Act of 1937, federal legislation designed to prohibit cannabis use. As Americans across the country work to end cannabis prohibition, the 1937 brand proudly stands for social justice and equality for all.

The Company plans to expand the 1937 Cannabis product line in Pennsylvania and Maryland and to make it available in other state-based markets in which Vireo is licensed to operate.

Learn more at: www.1937cannabis.com/ or follow the brand on Instagram www.instagram.com/1937cannabis/.

About Vireo Health International, Inc.
Vireo Health International, Inc.’s mission is to build the cannabis company of the future by bringing the best of medicine, engineering and science to the cannabis industry. Vireo’s physician-led team of nearly 400 employees provides best-in-class cannabis products and customer experience. Vireo cultivates cannabis in environmentally friendly greenhouses, manufactures pharmaceutical-grade cannabis extracts, and sells its products at both company-owned and third-party dispensaries. The Company currently is licensed in eleven markets including Arizona, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Mexico, New York, Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Puerto Rico, and Rhode Island. For more information about the Company, please visit www.vireohealth.com.

Contact Information

Media Inquiries
Albe Zakes
Vice President, Corporate Communications
albezakes@vireohealth.com
(267) 221-4800

Investor Inquiries
Sam Gibbons
Vice President, Investor Relations
samgibbons@vireohealth.com
(612) 314-8995

 

 

The post Vireo Health Launches 1937 Cannabis Brand appeared first on CannabisFN.

Original Post: CFN Media Group: Vireo Health Launches 1937 Cannabis Brand

Inventors File Patent Application For Scratch-And-Sniff Marijuana Packages

Inventors File Patent Application For Scratch-And-Sniff Marijuana Packages

Original Post: Marijuana Moment: Inventors File Patent Application For Scratch-And-Sniff Marijuana Packages

[Canniseur: Oh boy! Just what we need. Scratch and sniff cannabis packaging. Somehow, this is not a great idea. I don’t believe it’s possible to accurately reproduce the aroma of a good strain of cannabis. The aromas are a complex blend of terpenes, THCs, and other compounds that all contribute to the aroma of a particular strain of cannabis. It’s been tried with wine and it does not work. Why would cannabis be any different?]

Scratch-and-sniff marijuana packaging could be coming to a dispensary near you.

An application for a patent on the cannabis container concept was published by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office on Thursday. In order to comply with state regulations while at the same time ensuring consumers know what they’re buying, the inventors are pitching a secure package that uses non-THC volatiles to produce the scent of the product when a sticker on the exterior is scratched.

The applicants recognized in their filing that there’s an existing patent application for scratch-and-sniff stickers that are meant to identify the flavor of coffee, but argued their idea is distinct because the other application produced the scent of coffee after it’s brewed whereas this sticker would smell like cannabis in its unsmoked form.

“A major hurdle to the purchase of Cannabis is the secure packaging laws of various states,” the application states. “Packaging can often prevent a purchaser from observing certain characteristics of the Cannabis, such as its scent.”

In a summary of the proposal, the applicants said the “general purpose of the present invention is to provide a Cannabis package and method of selection that includes all the advantages of the secure packaging, and overcomes the drawbacks inherent therein.”

Random Vaughn and Jonathan Tanzer via USPTO.

Another advantage of the proposed packaging is to help patients identify medicinal properties of different marijuana varieties, or assess quality, without having to open the product, the applicants, Random Vaughn and Jonathan Tanzer of Olympia, Washington, argued. They said that scent is is important in “selecting Cannabis for medical reasons such as seizures, headaches, or insomnia.”

The application lists two iterations of the concept. The main one would involve a sticker that would be infused with the scent of cannabis. Terpenes, which are non-intoxicating compounds in the plant that give cannabis its smell and taste, would be used to produce the scent.

For the other, the scent wouldn’t correspond with the actual small of the marijuana itself, but instead various flavor notes, which are sometimes used in cannabis marketing to describe the product’s qualities similar to what’s often done with wine. The applicants listed a diverse list of potential smells, including freshly cut grass, bread, vanilla, bacon, fish and chips, a Christmas tree, cinnamon, after shave, shampoo, the seaside, furniture polish and a Sunday roast.

Inventors File Patent Application For Scratch-And-Sniff Marijuana Packages was posted on Marijuana Moment.

WTF Is a Steamroller Pipe and How Do You Use One?

WTF Is a Steamroller Pipe and How Do You Use One?

Original Post: Merry Jane: WTF Is a Steamroller Pipe and How Do You Use One?

[Canniseur: These pipes are over the top. Not in a bad way, but they’re the biggest pipes I’ve ever seen. Sort of like a bong without water…and sideways. These are crazy and fun.]

Meet the simple pipe with substantial results.

Wait, so not all pipes are the same?

We hate to break it to you, but even within the category of pipes, there is still a world of variation and competing opinions on which design is best. Some enjoy going “full Gandalf” with long wooden pipes, while others prefer the water filtration provided by bubblers. By contrast, the steamroller is about as simple as glassware gets.

STEAM ROLLER PIPE

What Is a Steamroller Pipe? 

Imagine the mouthpiece a bong. Now turn it sideways. That’s more or less the concept behind the steamroller, a horizontally-aligned pipe that’s long and narrow. There’s a reason for that added length! The additional space between the bowl and the mouthpiece allows for smoke to cool before being inhaled.

If you’ve ever had the misfortune of hitting a cheap chillum — essentially a short, conical pipe with no carb (the hole one holds and then releases) — you will likely recall the unpleasant sensation of having hot smoke hit your throat too fast.

While chillums do not have a carb, the steamroller, by contrast, has one in a rather unique place. On a standard pipe, you’ll usually find the carb on the side of the bowl, but on a steamroller, the carb is actually situated opposite the mouthpiece (at the far end of the pipe). In some cases, the carb is also larger than normal, which allows for a more powerful hit to be inhaled once the carb is “cleared.”

Thus, the steamroller can come in handy when you’re planning on taking some monster hits. This is actually the signature characteristic of the steamroller: it packs quite the punch. Naturally, this is how the steamroller earned its name. When it comes to steamrollers, if you’re not careful, it can flatten you! (Remember those old anti-drug PSAs? Us neither!)

How Do I Use a Steamroller? 

Now that we’ve gotten the precautionary warnings out of the way, let’s talk about how to get the most from your steamroller.

In terms of practical use, the process is as simple as packing the bowl, placing your finger or palm over the far end of the pipe, lighting the flower, inhaling, and finally removing your hand to clear the hit. While a bong is able to reduce the harshness of larger hits by filtrating the smoke through water, steamrollers are a “dry” pipe. This means those using a steamroller pipe should be prepared for a sizeable, potentially-jarring hit.

Efforts to avoid this scenario can certainly be applied. Most importantly, start slow with your steamroller. For this reason, steamrollers are also not the ideal method of consumption for beginners or for folks who have a low tolerance for THC. Don’t be the person that lets someone clear a massive hit off a steamroller during their first cannabis experience. It’s just bad etiquette.

1570736838630_steamroller3.jpg

What Kinds of Steamrollers Exist? 

All steamrollers meet the criteria described above, but beyond that, there’s certainly a number of options to consider.

Some steamrollers feature small feet or claws that allow for the pipe to sit comfortably on a table. In the context of cannabis consumption, there’s nothing sadder than watching a glass steamroller slowly roll its way off a table — and to its own demise.

Another option on some designs is an internal percolator. Percolators are water chambers, which, in the case of a steamroller, means smoother hits without the hassle of cleaning out the soiled water from your pipe afterwards.

Similarly, some steamrollers can be enhanced with a keck clip. Keck clips allow for the bowl to be easily attached and removed, which is a big win when it comes to keeping your equipment clean. Ditto for ashcatchers, which are available for some steamrollers, as well.

When it doubt, start simple and go from there!

Follow Zack Ruskin on Twitter

Original Post: Merry Jane: WTF Is a Steamroller Pipe and How Do You Use One?

5 Tips For Buying Quality Cannabis & CBD Oil

5 Tips For Buying Quality Cannabis & CBD Oil

[Canniseur: This is timely and valuable information. Please stay safe. These tips are being offered by the staff at Vessel, makers of the fabulous vessel vape pen. ]

5 Tips For Buying Quality Cannabis & CBD Oil For Your Vape Pen

Are cannabis oils and CBD oils safe to vape? If you’ve been paying attention to the news lately, you know that vaping is currently getting a lot of bad press. With around 450 cases of lung disease and six deaths across the country, vaping seems to be a common denominator.

However, according to health officials at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, as well as the Food and Drug Administration, they haven’t found a clear connection or cause to link the cases, although vaping is clearly playing a role.

There’s talk of added chemicals, fillers, misuse, fake cartridges, and an underground market of unregulated oils. And, while health professionals are still testing the products that caused the illnesses, no one can say for sure.

If you’re a vaping enthusiast, the times can be a little unsettling. However, it doesn’t mean that you have to give up your vape all together. If you know what to look for, and how to choose quality cannabis or CBD oil, you can guard yourself against some of the dangers that officials have been warning about.

Here are 5 tips to keep in mind when purchasing cannabis oil or CBD oil for your vape pen.

Avoid Vape Oil Brands With a Bad Reputation

Illicit vape oil brands should be avoided at all costs. According to an article in Bloomberg, 24 of 41 patients suffering from vape-related lung injuries were using THC products that were sold using the Dank Vapes label. Officials in the county of Hanford released a photo of the brand that one patient was using before becoming ill called West Coast Carts. While this alone is not enough to avoid all counterfeit vape cartridges, it’s a good starting point so you know which brands to stay away from. A little bit of googling can help you identify other brands with bad reputations.

Avoid Buying Oil From The Illicit Market

If you live in a legal state, make sure to always buy your THC oil and CBD vape oil from a verified dispensary. Legal states have regulated markets where it’s mandatory to do lab testing on vape carts, and manufacturers are required to include those test results on the labels. However, doing your due diligence is always recommended, even when buying vape oil legally. While many legal companies say that they don’t use harmful cutting agents in their products, there may be companies that try to cut corners by diluting oils with chemicals that can be harmful when heated.

If you’re living in a state where you don’t have access to legal CBD or THC oil vape cartridges, things can get a little murky. Black market producers can sell their products online or in pop-up markets, touting them as the real thing. They’ll typically have professional-looking branding, packaging, and often feature labels that say they’re lab tested.These vape carts are particularly dangerous because there’s no way to know what’s in them.

According to an article by USA Today, there were 32 cases of vaping-related illnesses reported in New York state, with a “vast majority” of them involving people who vape illicit marijuana. If you are buying from the black market, you can check out websites like DabConnection.com, or Instagram accounts like Cleanmedz, which provide up-to-date information on dangerous vaping products that have been discovered.

Learn How to Spot Counterfeit Oils

Counterfeit THC oils are becoming a massive problem. Even large brands like Heavy Hitters, Connected Cannabis Co., and Kingpen have fell victim to counterfeit versions of their products on the market. Since these fake products are made using similar branding, packaging, and logos, it can be hard to know the difference. Using these fake oils in your vape pen can be detrimental as they aren’t regulated or tested, and are often cut with dangerous fillers. According to Weedmaps, if a cartridge is priced significantly below the market price, it could be a sign that it’s fake.

They also suggest checking the serial number and QR code to make sure it’s the real thing. You can also do a quick Google search to find resources that can help you tell a real cartridge from a fake. Weedmaps also curates verified and trusted cannabis products, which can help you make a more informed choice.

Choose Oil That Does Not Contain Vitamin E

According to New York health officials, nearly all of the cannabis vaping products that were analyzed in the investigation of these illnesses contained large amounts of the chemical, vitamin E acetate. Vitamin E is showing up in vape oils, especially those on the black market, as a thickener so that diluted vape oils won’t look watery, a red flag that it’s cut with something. While this vitamin is typically okay to take as a pill or use on the skin, it can trigger pneumonia when inhaled.

Check Labels & Lab Test Results

When buying THC oil and CBD oil carts, always check the labels. Legal vape oils are typically required to display lab test results so you can make an informed decision about what you’re vaping. Check to make sure the cannabis used to make the oil was grown without dangerous pesticides. You’ll also want to stay away from non-cannabis additives and flavors. Check labels for anything listed as “non-cannabis derived terpenes, natural or artificial flavors.” Now, some dispensaries like Kind Leaf, are identifying products on their shelves with these additives, and thinking twice about carrying them.

Keep in mind that cutting agents like polyethylene glycol (PEG,) propylene glycol (PG,) and vegetable glycerine (VG) are commonly used in vape oils to keep the mixture consistent, help with draw, and create a larger cloud. While the Food and Drug Administration has said these cutting agents are safe for humans to ingest, there have been studies published that say they could actually be quite dangerous when inhaled. According to Weedmaps, there is now a rising number of cannabis oil producers who are insisting on not using any cutting agents in their products. So, if you’re worried about these additives, you may want to shop for oils without them.

If you arm yourself with this information, buying quality vape oils can be far less intimidating. Keep in mind that your vape pen matters too. Devices that heat oil at too high of a temperature can be potentially dangerous. Heating oil at high temperatures can release noxious gases that can be bad for your health. Vape pens like Vessel work on a lower power spectrum to make vaping even safer.

Always buy from a legal dispensary, read the label to better understand what you’re getting, and ask questions, both online, and in-store, to make sure you feel comfortable with your purchase. Stay safe!

Original Article: 5 Tips For Buying Quality Cannabis & CBD Oil

How To Spot a Fake Vape Cartridge

[Please only purchase your vape cartridges from a licensed dispensary. The legal industry is trying to get to the bottom of this health crisis, with many dispensaries now testing for vitamin E. If your State doesn’t have legalized cannabis, use flower products.]

This year’s alarming wave of vaping-associated pulmonary injury has already made up to 530 people sick and killed as many as six people. If you use disposable vaporizer cartridges, how can you make sure that the one you’re puffing on is safe?

While there are no foolproof methods (even well-regulated markets sometimes have recalls), there are many ways to reduce the risk of consuming a contaminated product. Read on to learn how you can spot a fake or contaminated vape cartridge.

When it comes to avoiding dangerous vape carts, the number one piece of advice we heard from the experts was to avoid the illicit market.

“My honest opinion is to make sure to purchase vape carts from a licensed dispensary,” says Neil Dellacava, buyer at California cannabis brand Gold Seal. “I would just completely avoid buying cartridges from anyone that isn’t licensed.”

Licensed Products Are Much Safer, but Not Completely Safe

From cannabis industry professionals, to testing lab experts, to California’s consumer affairs and public health agencies, everyone we spoke to reiterated the point that cannabis from the legal market is likely to be safer given factors like increased accountability and the rigorous testing required by state law.

Read the rest of this story at Leafly:

Original Post: Leafly: How To Spot a Fake Vape Cartridge

What’s in Your Stash? Charles McElroy, Founder of Goldleaf

What’s in Your Stash? Charles McElroy, Founder of Goldleaf

Original Post: High Times: What’s in Your Stash? Charles McElroy, Founder of Goldleaf

[Canniseur: I keep a journal of my experiences with different strains. Here’s a way you can track your experiences, whether for medical reasons or pleasure reasons. This is a good idea for anyone who wants to be able to describe what it is they like. This is very classy as well!]

Unsurprisingly, Charles McElroy has a Goldleaf journal in his stash.

Is there a Patient Journal in your stash? Perhaps a Recreational Tasting Journal – something to keep track of the many wonderful cultivars and products you sample? How about a record to help you keep track of your daily cannabis protocols? Or, how about a Grow Planner for tracking the phases of your grow cycle; or a Cooking Journal, created specifically as a “Culinary Companion” for your kitchen apothecary?

What if all these record-keeping journals and more were available in high-end, beautifully detailed, compact publications that fit into your satchel?

Charles McElroy was thinking the same thing, as he created the intelligently penned Goldleaf line of journals, reference cards, recipe cards, and a plethora of scientific reference material for the modern-day cannabis farmer, patient, and partaker.

From its website: “…Goldleaf is a science-forward printing company for cannabis growers, patients, and enthusiasts… empowering people by helping them better understand their interactions with the plant…”

“I wanted to make something that people who are passionate about cannabis could further engage with,” McElroy explained. “The cloak of the [illicit] market wouldn’t allow growers to write down their process, now they can.” 


Courtesy of Charles McElroy

From Ignorance, to Realization, to Action

McElroy hails from Ohio, attending Ohio University in Athens, graduating with a dual major of Business and IT in 2004. 

“I began using cannabis in college,” he shared. “I had a couple of health conditions since I was 15 – autoimmune disorders, chronic pain. The first time I tried cannabis it wasn’t pleasant, but it wasn’t too bad, as I tried it again the next day. I was always a little anxious about how it would affect me, because I was uneducated. Then I learned about the social injustice of cannabis prohibition – the oppression, discrimination, how people are treated as criminals for using this plant.”

Cannabis was McElroy’s gateway to learning. He said the plant not only taught him about the injustice of prohibition and the lack of education thereafter, it taught him what his own body needs, and how to be more proactive about his health.

“Cannabis changed the way I handle my symptoms. I microdose now – that’s where I found my secret sauce,” he laughed.

Stints in audio engineering for both the Library of Congress in Austin, Texas; and in a studio with recording artists, taught him about audio fatigue.

“Your work will go downhill if you ignore the signs,” he said. “Cannabis reset my mind and ears – it helped me work better and smarter.”

After working in Texas and Colorado, McElroy made his way back to Ohio, and helped start up a company called Noble, with a line of organic and sustainable jeans, Bespoke. 

“I worked in every aspect of the supply chain, distribution, and product design, but it wasn’t my passion,” he said. “We sold the company to a group in Australia, and I started Goldleaf in Cincinnati in 2016.”

The Noble team helped with the initial designs and photography, while its legal team got him on the right path.

Courtesy of Charles McElroy

Dispelling Myths

“We wanted Goldleaf materials to be beautiful, but we also needed all the information to be accurate,” he said. “It took one year for the Patient Journal to be developed because we had to vet experts in the space. The first four doctors we used wouldn’t let us use their names, but that was alright – we wanted their minds and expertise.”

Learning how to navigate providing educational materials on cannabis in a formerly covert environment had its pratfalls, as misinformation is rampant in the industry.

“It used to be a common belief that Myrcene, one of the terpenes found in cannabis, enhances THC uptake – like when you eat a mango,” he explained. “But, we found that’s really not what’s going on. We could not find one single peer reviewed paper on this theory. We had to update the language in our Patient Journal and everything else that referenced terpenes.”

Goldleaf makes it simple for the average reader, but they also stay close to the scientific vernacular.

“For people who are into the culture of cannabis, the scientific aspect is often new to them,” he said. “We aim to be the encyclopedia of cannabis and offer proven scientific facts only, but you won’t find any recommendations on dosing – we leave that up to the medical professionals in the space.”

Like cannabis, the journals and educational materials Goldleaf publishes are used around the world – even in non-legal countries.

“We have customers on every continent except Antarctica,” he laughed. “We even shipped to one small country we had never heard of – Seychelles, a tiny island off the coast of Africa/Madagascar. There are 95 thousand people on this island, but they found us and are using the journals.”

Courtesy of Charles McElroy

Journaling the Stash

Prominently displayed with McElroy’s stash is his own Patient Journal by Goldleaf.

“I always keep notes when I’m medicating – or traveling and trying new cultivars,” he explained. “I like to use colored pencils to give myself a little more flexibility with details and notes – plus it keeps it fun and exciting.”

His rolling tray is made by Cannador, and although he generally vapes, he enjoys smoking blends when burning flower, adding mullen and spearmint to the mix. His favorite cultivars are Jack Herer, Orange CBD, and Chemdawg.

“My personal choice for a vaporizer is the Arizer Solo 2 Vape,” he added. “It has a long battery life, is built like a tank, and has an all glass path. It’s great for my regimen of micro-dosing, since I can easily monitor the amount used. I also enjoy the granular temperature control – allowing lower heat for tasting more of the terpenes, and ensuring the dose is mild when it needs to be.”

He uses a Canndescent Stylus vape pen, as it has a clip and can attach to his journal; a course herb grinder, keeping material from slipping through smoking implements; dark glass flower jars, keeping his herb fresh and potent; and an MJ Arsenal glass bubbler, for sharing.

“I also take 1000 milligrams of CBD oil in the morning, made by Rosebud,” he said. “It helps with some of my joint and lower back spasms. This, mixed with some yoga in the mornings, keeps me going and keeps the tightness and throbbing at bay.”

The Future Looks Green

In the works are art prints, likened to vintage travel posters, with cities depicted with their relation to cannabis – picture Ohio with a focus on hemp. The first phase of posters will include Ohio, Northern California, Southern California, Oregon, and Colorado; set to launch winter of 2019.

“They will be stylized conversation pieces, helping people talk about issues related to cannabis and sustainability,” he said. “We’ve been working with some famous artists, and are really excited about their launch. They are absolutely beautiful – a priority in everything we publish.”

Goldleaf is also collaborating with a veterinarian to create Pet Journals, helping pet owners keep track of products and protocols with confidence.

“Humans aren’t the only species on the planet who needs cannabis,” he surmised. “The reason I was so nervous when I tried cannabis for the first time was simply due to a lack of education. We at Goldleaf are trying to change that – in a beautiful and intelligent way.”

What’s in Your Stash? Charles McElroy, Founder of Goldleaf was posted on High Times.

Cannabis Edibles, A Call for  Consistency

Cannabis Edibles, A Call for Consistency

Why Consistency Matters in Cannabis Edibles

The story is a familiar one; I decided to try a different company for cannabis edibles and found them ineffective or uncomfortably strong (or weak) due to inconsistency in their manufacturing. Sometimes this is just a mild inconvenience or waste of money but other times it makes for a very sustained, uncomfortable, and inescapable experience. It’s no secret to those that know me, I love Wana gummies. No matter how many times I have them, they’re always the same. Inexpensive, consistent in strength and flavor, and easy for me to find here in Colorado. I’ve yet to be as impressed with another company, though they are slowly catching up. When I purchase a cannabis edible that touts 10mg of THC per serving, it shouldn’t matter if it’s a gummy, chocolate, lollipop, lemonade, or the myriad of other confections I haven’t listed. I want to be able to trust that it’s actually what it says it is.

Regulating Cannabis Edible Consistency

My home state began regulating potency in the middle of last year, with a whopping 179 page document outlining all of Colorado cannabis edible rules. It allows for a 15% variance, meaning that for a standardized 10mg dose, can be anywhere between 8.5-11.5mg. For someone like me who routinely eats 30mg at a shot, that subtle variation isn’t a huge deal, but would be for friends who consume a puny 2.5mg dose and are stoned. It can be a major issue. Even the National Institute of Health addressed that “severe cannabis-induced behavioral impairment are common [in edibles], experienced by 65 percent of medicinal cannabis users”. That’s an enormous pool of people!

While there is a much smaller variance in cannabis edibles these days, I still run into problems. Labs only test portions of the products, so who’s to assure that the entire batch is consistent? The labs themselves have run into issues also, with some being found to have fraudulent certifications or simply erroneous results. In some states even if a lab admits they made an error, the results are permanent, and can result in destruction of the entire batch of products. So what do we do?

Cannabis Edible Taste Matters

While there is always a place in my stomach for some homemade hash brownies, major companies need good manufacturing processes when they hit the market to assure a consistent and delicious product. Make no mistake, making edibles is a major manufacturing endeavor, despite often letting you think they are a mom and pop operation. Consumers are growing more demanding and when I have 50 different choices of edibles at a given time to choose from, if it’s not great (potency or taste), I will likely never try it again. The bad ones or the inconsistent ones, will die out. In the same way that a Budweiser® tastes the same if I drink it in China, Milwaukee, or Amsterdam, companies should be able to replicate their edibles in the same manor.

So far, Wana is still the only one to impress me in this way but I hope the industry proves me wrong. Step up manufacturers of cannabis edibles. Show us how its done.

Vaping Dry Flower vs Vaping Cannabis Oil

Vaping Dry Flower vs Vaping Cannabis Oil

Vaping has become a popular way to consume cannabis and there are a variety of ways you can vape cannabis to get the results you’re looking for. The differences between vaping dry flower and vaping oils (also called concentrates) have long been debated. Both types of cannabis consumption are valid and both have different effects and uses.

Cannabis consumers tend to be very loyal to their preferences between vaping dry flower or vaping oils. It’s hard to know what will work for you since each person is going to react differently and have different goals when using cannabis while vaping. Neither option is wrong, it’s just about what works for you.

In a survey report from TVape, a whopping 86% of the 700 respondents agreed to the statement that they “felt generally better after vaporizing as opposed to smoking”. One thing for sure, people do seem to prefer vaporizing to smoking.

If you aren’t sure about the differences vaporizing cannabis or vaping oils yet, that’s ok. There’s a lot of research out there and it’s hard to narrow it all down. You probably even have friends telling you one way is better than the other. With that in mind, here are some concrete differences between vaping dry flower and vaping concentrates.

What Is Cannabis Concentrate?

A cannabis concentrate is a product stripped of the excess plant material and impurities leaving behind only the most desirable parts of the cannabis. When compared ounce to ounce with natural cannabis flower, concentrates have a greater proportion of cannabinoids and terpenes.

Concentrates come in many forms, like wax, creams, lotions, and oils. It gets so complicated that UCLA came up with a whole page on cannabis concentrate terminology. They all have their own particular uses but vaping with oil is what you’re looking for information on at this point.

Understanding the composition of oil will help you understand the differences between vaping flower and vaping oil.

What Are The Benefits Of Vaping Cannabis Oil?

Concentrates like oil have a higher percentage of THC when compared to dried flower cannabis. This gives the oil a more potent punch when vaped. For patients using cannabis as a treatment for symptoms like anxiety or pain, this is a good thing. It acts more quickly and is a more powerful dose of medication to really attack the symptoms and calm them more efficiently at times.

Vaping oil recreationally also has similar effects. Many recreational users will find they reach their preferred level of high while vaping oil. Again, this has a lot to do with the higher concentration of THC in the oil.

When it comes to cannabis oil there’s definitely a less is more factor. A small amount of oil may not look helpful but it’s definitely extremely powerful.

Oils are also easier to use on the go since they come in easily carried forms. Pre-filled cartridges are almost impossible to mess up, and they’re so portable you don’t have to worry about not having your cannabis with you when you need it. If you get hit by a sudden wave of panic you have something fast-acting on hand that you can use right away.

[Related: Vessel Vape Pen Review]

Is Processed Cannabis Safe in Oil Form?

Zeus vape pen
Harvard’s Peter Grinspoon can’t answer his own question in this post on the safety of CBD, let alone THC. He asks the questions and then dodges it, so it will be hard to get a definitive answer.

Remember how concentrates are made? They’re stripped of all parts of the plant, which includes the terpenes. Since terpenes in marijuana are part of what gives medicinal benefits that can be an issue if you’re vaping to treat a medical condition.

Terpenes are often added back in with artificial flavorings but it’s not quite the same. It’s sort of like drinking apple juice and thinking you’re getting the same nutrition as an actual apple. This doesn’t mean oil has zero benefits, in fact, you’ve already read about the many benefits oil vaping does have. It’s just something to be aware of.

There’s also something to be said about removing the ritual involved in preparing the dry flower version. Some cannabis consumers prefer the ritual and find it to be part of their calming encounter with marijuana consumption. Again, that comes down to personal preference but a pre-filled cartridge isn’t going to give you that option.

What Are The Benefits Of Vaporizing Dry Flower?

Dry flower (or dry herbs) have all the parts of the plant included. That means you’re getting all the natural terpenes and cannabinoids straight from the plant itself.

Vaping cannabis flower gives you the full aroma and taste of the plant as well. Some cannabis consumers claim that vaping the dry herb is a fuller, richer experience that can’t be mimicked by vaping cannabis oil.

The psychoactive effects are different as well. You’re already aware of the THC difference but vaping dry flower creates a different effect overall. The high from vaping dried flower is going to be more like the high from smoking a joint or bowl. If that’s the effect you are seeking, then vaping dry flower is a great option for you.

What Are The Negatives Of Vaping Dry Cannabis?

Because it’s a plant that isn’t regulated yet (as it’s not federally legal yet) there’s no way to certify it as organic. While specific growers may use organic practices, overall there’s no industry standard on what pesticides are or are not ok to use. It’s possible you could be exposed to pesticides passed on through vaping dry herb.

Research also waivers on the effects of vaping dry flower on your lungs. Nothing is concrete on either side of the debate, but there is some question as to the long term effects of vaping dry flower. These same discussions are not being had when it comes to vaping cannabis in oil form.

It’s nothing that is conclusive enough to discourage you from vaping dry herb but it’s something you should still be aware of. If you have lung issues currently you should speak with your doctor to see what they think is best regarding your own personal health issues and what types of cannabis you choose to consume.

Conclusion

Vaping Dry Flower vs vaping oil
You’re the only one who can make the best choice about which way you want to consume your cannabis. It’s okay if you try vaping both dry flower and cannabis oil before deciding which you like best, but before you decide, remember that not even Harvard’s PhDs have an easy time answering these questions yet.

You can also consult your doctor, a dispensary employee, or cannabis expert to help you make a more informed decision. Whichever option is best for you, you’re bound to enjoy the great benefits of vaping cannabis. Find what works for you and stick with that. You’ll be more than thrilled when you do.

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