Cannabis Edibles, A Call for  Consistency

Cannabis Edibles, A Call for Consistency

Why Consistency Matters in Cannabis Edibles

The story is a familiar one; I decided to try a different company for cannabis edibles and found them ineffective or uncomfortably strong (or weak) due to inconsistency in their manufacturing. Sometimes this is just a mild inconvenience or waste of money but other times it makes for a very sustained, uncomfortable, and inescapable experience. It’s no secret to those that know me, I love Wana gummies. No matter how many times I have them, they’re always the same. Inexpensive, consistent in strength and flavor, and easy for me to find here in Colorado. I’ve yet to be as impressed with another company, though they are slowly catching up. When I purchase a cannabis edible that touts 10mg of THC per serving, it shouldn’t matter if it’s a gummy, chocolate, lollipop, lemonade, or the myriad of other confections I haven’t listed. I want to be able to trust that it’s actually what it says it is.

Regulating Cannabis Edible Consistency

My home state began regulating potency in the middle of last year, with a whopping 179 page document outlining all of Colorado cannabis edible rules. It allows for a 15% variance, meaning that for a standardized 10mg dose, can be anywhere between 8.5-11.5mg. For someone like me who routinely eats 30mg at a shot, that subtle variation isn’t a huge deal, but would be for friends who consume a puny 2.5mg dose and are stoned. It can be a major issue. Even the National Institute of Health addressed that “severe cannabis-induced behavioral impairment are common [in edibles], experienced by 65 percent of medicinal cannabis users”. That’s an enormous pool of people!

While there is a much smaller variance in cannabis edibles these days, I still run into problems. Labs only test portions of the products, so who’s to assure that the entire batch is consistent? The labs themselves have run into issues also, with some being found to have fraudulent certifications or simply erroneous results. In some states even if a lab admits they made an error, the results are permanent, and can result in destruction of the entire batch of products. So what do we do?

Cannabis Edible Taste Matters

While there is always a place in my stomach for some homemade hash brownies, major companies need good manufacturing processes when they hit the market to assure a consistent and delicious product. Make no mistake, making edibles is a major manufacturing endeavor, despite often letting you think they are a mom and pop operation. Consumers are growing more demanding and when I have 50 different choices of edibles at a given time to choose from, if it’s not great (potency or taste), I will likely never try it again. The bad ones or the inconsistent ones, will die out. In the same way that a Budweiser® tastes the same if I drink it in China, Milwaukee, or Amsterdam, companies should be able to replicate their edibles in the same manor.

So far, Wana is still the only one to impress me in this way but I hope the industry proves me wrong. Step up manufacturers of cannabis edibles. Show us how its done.

What Do You Like in a Cannabis Strain?

What Do You Like in a Cannabis Strain?

Even if you offered me a million bucks, there’s no way I could articulate a perfect cannabis strain to you; they simply don’t exist. No one strain has everything. Ever. Sometimes I want a light pineapple flavor with a Sativa buzz to send me to the stars. Other times simply bottomless sleep. Maybe it’s pain, a migraine, nausea, or maybe I just decide take down two pizzas; let’s discuss a few…

What Drives Your Cannabis Strain Selection?

Despite aroma coming to my mind first, taste is actually the most interesting for me. An often-overlooked factor, taste requires excellent technical execution during the grow, with good nutrients and more importantly, a proper flush at the end. Nothing sucks worse than having some bitterness on the burn because of a little fertilizer late in the flowering cycle. It ruins many strains for me. Similarly, this can be an absence of flavor depending on the micronutrients or other issues.

Superior Taste of a Cannabis Strain

I remember making a bonsai tree many years ago with a phenotype of Jack Herer, which was very unique in its pineapple flavor and aroma. We had 4 main types going around California at the time, and by now there could be 10 more, but this one was special! This little plant was an absolute wreck to grow and a nightmare to even find. It had tiny buds, took a long time to grow, was sensitive to minor fluctuations in the pH and growing process, yet despite these shortcomings, the flavor was out of this world. The effects were too. It’s the whole package that made it exceptional. But while the effects were great, and the energy high, the flavor that lingered was what made this memorable.

Cannabis Potency

That Jack Herer represents a fine and very expensive wine to savor but did little for pain; that’s where Granddaddy Purple comes in. I know you’re probably thinking to yourself, “hey, that’s old and there are newer and stronger strains”. You’d be right. It’s old, having been around for almost 20 years and there are indeed stronger strains with THC levels over 30%. For me it’s important to define potency as it refers to the desired effects. If I’m in pain, I don’t actually need the THC. I’ll opt for CBD and other cannabinoid compounds and terpenes found in Granddaddy Purps over other strains, because of its overall effect and possible entourage effects.

Cannabis for Gluttony and Self Loathing

We all have those days we want to end early, where everything was terrible, the sky fell, your feet hurt, and you want to release your sorrows for a bit; here comes Trainwreck. Sure, the last time this happened I woke up next to the remains of a medium pizza, 3 cinnabons, and a pint of ice-cream, but who says that’s a bad thing?! It’s like taking a sledgehammer to the face; it’s unwelcomed but it gets the job done. Thinking about it now, I can almost feel the terpenes emanating off of the buds. It’s potent in THC, in terpenes, and often when harvested a little later, CBD and CBN. The flavor is also like a train wreck but no strain is perfect.

Party Time Cannabis Strains

Verde has an incredible Super Lemon Haze that nails almost every category at once; incredible flavor, citrus aroma, dense buds, potency that gets my head swimming but still allows me to function and at only $10 a gram, it’s a great deal. At social events, it keeps my energy stays high and allows me to function. In high doses the heady stone seeps into the room, but can also provide laser focus when you end up inadvertently grilling chicken for 25 people. Most of the purple Indicas would put me to sleep, Jack Herer would turn me into mush, and Trainwreck: well I’d probably try to eat all 25 pieces of chicken.

These are only a few of the limitless characteristics and strains I enjoy; and those same strains are going to differ further when they hop from a bong, to a pipe, to a vape. The possibilities are endless. Next time you pick out your next bud, maybe ask yourself, what it is that you’re actually hoping for.

Cannabis Harvest Timing: Earlier vs Later

Cannabis Harvest Timing: Earlier vs Later

Every time I harvest cannabis, I make a conscious choice; do I want to harvest a heady, clean buzz that borders on psychedelic, or a descent into the depths of my couch, with my eyelids growing heavier by the second, and the room slowly falling dark?  Harvest timing (among other things) has an enormous effect on the properties of any strain you’re growing. At it’s extremes, it can make even the best Sativas act like an Indicas or vice versa.

It’s About the Trichomes

At the simplest level (it’s still very complicated), it comes down to trichome development.  To understand this we need to understand what a trichome is and why we should care.

Trichomes & Harvest

Photo: Royal Seed Company

Trichomes are small glandular hairs found on Cannabis plants, which probably first developed as a protection mechanism for our favorite plant.  If you’ve ever looked at a poster of a big juicy bud while waiting in your favorite dispensary, you’ve certainly seen trichomes.  They function to keep away insects just like the way capsaicin in hot peppers exists to stop animals from eating them.  The irony is that these same compounds such as THC, CBD, and terpenes, are the ones we’re interested in.  As the plants develop, the trichomes start out clear, progressing through cloudy into amber. Each phase has very different qualities.

Earlier Cannabis Harvest

When I talk about an early harvest, it means most of the trichomes are cloudy.  When trichomes are cloudy but still whitish, their mix of chemistry provides an extremely clean sort of psychedelic experience.  On a haze, it allows my consumers to toke as much as they desire, boosting the psychedelic qualities while simultaneously bringing “couch lock” down to almost zero.  It’s very energetic and energizing. You won’t become sedated, and the effect can mimic narcotics or other compounds.  Many may doubt me, but I’ve absolutely hallucinated on weed harvested in this way.

Later Cannabis Harvest

I’ve taken those same strains and harvested later (some trichomes are amber and some are cloudy) and produced something reminiscent of a hybrid. Lemon Haze is a favorite for this since later harvesting boosts its flavor.  Feelings of couchlock are reintroduced, with higher levels of CBD forming in the amber trichomes as they oxidize and degrade. Harvest timing is a tool I use to customize different strains.  There are drawbacks for either earlier or later harvest.

Earlier vs Later Cannabis Harvest

The more time I allow for my plants to flower, the easier it is to pack on more weight.  It’s in my best interest to make my buds heavy, compact, and potent, for both my bottom line and my consumers experience.  No one wants fluffy buds but I’ll talk about what I look for when purchasing fresh flower later.  It’s all a balancing act, where a day or two can tip the scales.  The longer I wait, the more amber trichomes I have, the more THC breaks down and forms CBD (and other compounds), and eventually flavor suffers.  However, if I’m too early those same compounds have yet to peak.  In some cases, this may be what I want.

Harvesting Time for Medicinal Cannabis

When growing strains for medicinal purposes, I usually harvest late.  They wouldn’t be considered recreational by most consumers due to their highly sedative effects, which is why demand is generally lower (less demand means less profitability).  Most have massive CBD contents and very little THC, which was aided by a late harvest.  Cancer patients don’t care about getting high, they just want to be able to eat and sleep.  This accomplishes that goal (in conjunction with good breeding).

On the flip side, the last time I grew Trainwreck I harvested a portion early for a more recreational feel and it blew my mind.  I sacrificed a small amount of weight, which would have gained back by letting it continue to grow. The earlier harvest created a product on another level of high.  The trichomes were mostly milky, and lent to an incredibly clean buzz.  Early harvests also cause diminished terpenes such as Myrcene which are notorious for couchlock, helping drive a mind-altering experience.  For some, it’s a bit too strong and may not be a pleasant experience so choose wisely.

The Typical Harvest Time

When in doubt, a normal harvest where 25% of the trichomes are amber and the rest are milky is fine.  It’s (fairly) standard and will still give you amazing products.  For those of us in the industry wanting to tweak strains a bit further, timing is one of many tools available.  Next time you’re curious, grab a magnifying glass and take a look for yourself.

About the Author

Joey d’Artagnan holds a multiple degrees from top institutions including a bachelors in chemistry. He also has comprehensive education in botany and horticulture, and has spent over 10 years consulting extensively for both the craft beer and cannabis industries. His experience includes both indoor and outdoor production-scale grows, encompassing soil, hydroponic, and aeroponic methods. Additionally, Joey has developed cloning, breeding, and edible programs for a variety of top-tier cannabis and hemp operations spanning both coasts. Joey currently resides in Boulder, Colorado.

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