Celebrating Jack Herer, ‘The Hemperor’

Celebrating Jack Herer, ‘The Hemperor’

Original Post: Cannabis Now: Celebrating Jack Herer, ‘The Hemperor’

[Canniseur: In time for Jack’s 81st birthday wonderful story about how Jack Herer changed the world we knew as every state had prohibitions in place. Now that’s not the case and Mr. Herer is one the persons we have to thank for this! P.S. Love the strain as well.]

Jack Herer was likely the figure most responsible for the revolution in cannabis consciousness in the 1990s — especially where the industrial applications of hemp are concerned.

Born June 18, 1939, Jack Herer was a cannabis rights activist the author of The Emperor Wears No Clothes, his landmark book calling for the re-scheduling and legalization of cannabis.

As a veteran of the Korean War, Herer was one of the first veterans leading the fight to legalize cannabis, and took the fight all the way to President Reagan himself. Passing away in 2010, Herer never lived to see a single state legalize cannabis for recreational use.

This week marks Herer’s birthday and to honor his legacy, here are four articles that will bring you closer to the legend who fought for the legalization of cannabis for nearly all his life.

READ: Remembering the Godfather of the Modern Hemp Legalization Movement

Eddy Lepp, a cannabis activist who has been arrested for growing medical marijuana numerous times, remembers his friend and colleague in the cannabis movement, Jack Herer. Lepp gives great insight Herer’s life and paints an accurate image of the cannabis community during the ’70s and ’80s.

Jack Herer strain
PHOTO Seedfinder.eu

READ: Strain Review – Jack Herer

This world-renowned strain was named after and bred in honor of the legendary author and cannabis activist, Jack Herer. As one of the industry’s most awarded strains, it’s become a staple for connoisseur smokers and growers alike and is regarded by many as one of the most elite hybrids ever created.

PHOTO Martin Vorel

READ: Re-Legalize it? Herer’s Legacy Lives on in Hemp Initiative

The legendary hemp crusader Jack Herer drew up a California ballot initiative for a cannabis economy based on maximum freedom. He did not live to see its passage. But amid growing disillusionment with the Prop 64 legalization model, his heirs believe that in 2020, his hour has posthumously arrived.

Bright yellow Jack Herer infused butternut squash risotto sits in a yelloware bowl, with a wooden spoon sitting atop.
Photo via Pixabay

READ: Jack Herer Butternut Squash Risotto Recipe

Using cannabutter made from the strain Jack Herer, chef Jessica Catalano presents a delicious Butternut Squash Risotto edibles recipe. If you want to get really nerdy in celebrating The Hemperor’s birthday, get your ingredients to make this dish on June 18.

TELL US, did you know Jack Herer’s story?

The post Celebrating Jack Herer, ‘The Hemperor’ appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Celebrating Jack Herer, ‘The Hemperor’ was posted on Cannabis Now.

10 Cannabis Photographers Who Have Changed the Game

10 Cannabis Photographers Who Have Changed the Game

Original Post: Cannabis Now: 10 Cannabis Photographers Who Have Changed the Game

[Canniseur: Photography is a great medium. Here are 10 terrific photographers who deserve this recognition for being top in their craft for cannabis photography.]

Cannabis Now has been keeping tabs on the cannabis photography niche for almost a decade now and there’s no question that since legalization and decriminalization have spread across the nation, the quality within the cannabis photographer community has grown tremendously. We have had the pleasure of working with many of these pros throughout the years and are excited to see the cannabis photography industry expand.

Here’s our round-up of some of the top cannabis photographers in the game and their unique stories.

The rest of this story 10 Cannabis Photographers Who Have Changed the Game is on Cannabis Now.

10 Cannabis Photographers Who Have Changed the Game was posted on Cannabis Now.

Tips for Planning Your Spring Cannabis Garden at Home

Tips for Planning Your Spring Cannabis Garden at Home

Original Post: Cannabis Now: Tips for Planning Your Spring Cannabis Garden at Home

[Canniseur: It’s springtime and time to plant all our seeds; lettuce, peas, pot…yop. And this year, amid all the social distancing, it’s time to think about your crop that will make you happy after you’re well fed. Time to up your cannabis growing game!]

There’s a lot to consider before making the decision to create and sustain a cannabis garden. Cultivators can never know too much about growing cannabis, so being educated about the process and diligent about the health of the crop will make a world of difference.

We’ve collected some articles designed to help you prepare your home garden for spring. Happy planting!

How To Prep Your Garden to Grow PotPHOTO Gracie Malley

The post Tips for Planning Your Spring Cannabis Garden at Home appeared first on Cannabis Now.

Tips for Planning Your Spring Cannabis Garden at Home was posted on Cannabis Now.

Blunt-Tastic Boxes: The Best Humidors in the Game

Blunt-Tastic Boxes: The Best Humidors in the Game

Original Post: Cannabis Now: Blunt-Tastic Boxes: The Best Humidors in the Game

[Canniseur: Just like the article about “Luxury Cannabis” there will also be room for nice expensive humidors for your favorite bud. You can’t store your bud in a plastic bag any more, so if you can afford one of these, at least you’ll know your flower is staying fresh. As for me, I like little mason jars with a 62% Boveda humidity pack inside. The system works great for me.]

We got some bad news — that sweet smell of dank in your room is the smell of your medicine and money evaporating into the air. ]

Cannabis’s terpenes (or odor molecules) are therapeutically active and contribute immensely to bud’s overall effects. You need to keep your terps in your bud, bruh, and that means sealing it in a dark, temperature and humidity-controlled enclosure.

You need a frickin’ cigar humidor!

Icky Box and Icky XL

Icky; $49.99/$79.99; theicky.com

For starters, try the Icky Box, or the Icky Box XL, which are $39 and $69 respectively. Designed by three bros in Miami, FL., Icky Boxes are ideal personal cannabis humidors. Both sizes are about seven inches wide, and the XL is taller and deeper. Both come with a special slot and a fresh Boveda humidity pack. You open the pack’s wrapper, slot it in the Box, and it’ll keep your stash at a fresh 62% relative humidity for about eight weeks — no matter what the ambient conditions. Icky Boxes are handmade in the U.S. from thick cherry wood that’s cut, glued, sanded, stained and one-of-a-kind. It feels crazy the first time you leave some fresh herb just sitting open in the Box’s metal tins and drop the top down. But come back weeks later and the bud’s stems still snap like you just opened a bag. And those terps? They’re all yours. Now that’s dope.
David Downs

4-Strain Cannador

Cannador; $149-$208; cannador.com

Here is the stylish cannabis stash kit of your dreams. Made of mahogany with a cherry wood interior that’s been sustainably forested, this Cannador 4-Strain humidor is an aesthetic and functional beauty. An elegantly designed airtight cannabis repository for short- and long-term storage, this humidor’s discreet appearance could easily blend into any decor or area of your house and remain covert and odor-free. Four of the five cans store an eighth of an ounce a-piece. The center can holds a quarter-ounce. Each metal canister has a clear lid with adjustable air holes to control optimal ventilation. The humidity device is a clear case of beads activated by dipping into water and affixes via a magnet to the inner portion of the lid. Total dimensions of the system measure roughly 5 x 10 x 11 inches, with a handy stowage nook for accessories like grinder, lighter and dab tools. Cannador has created a handsome humidity-control system that impeccably preserves your top-shelf bud maintaining an optimized degree of freshness, taste and dankness. — Dave Carpenter

Cannaseur One Walnut w/ Box

Cannaseur; $259; cannaseur.io

These German-made humidors provide a sturdy storage solution. Cannaseur is crafted from walnut or mahogany, woods that don’t release oils after processing, meaning your pristine ganja won’t come out reeking of the woody cedar hamster change funk some other wood boxes can leave behind. Humidors have stored items like cigars and pipe tobacco for years and as sustainable cultivation of premium marijuana continues to blossom alongside the appreciation of this horticultural artform, it’s only natural they would evolve to store a much-safer plant. The Cannaseur comes with a humidity bead system and distilled water to establish the right humidity level for your marijuana stash. — Ellen Holland

 

Blunt-Tastic Boxes: The Best Humidors in the Game was posted on Cannabis Now.

You’ve Grown It, Now Own It: How to Master Drying & Curing Cannabis

You’ve Grown It, Now Own It: How to Master Drying & Curing Cannabis

Original Post: Cannabis Now: You’ve Grown It, Now Own It: How to Master Drying & Curing Cannabis

[Canniseur: There’s nothing as good as lighting up a bowl of your favorite flower and enjoying the taste. There’s nothing worse than lighting up a bowl of your favorite flower that’s not been dried and cured properly. The process of drying and curing your cannabis is as important as growing it. Once you’ve harvested, the important process of drying and curing begins.]

Properly dried and cured cannabis flower buds burn evenly and have a smooth, rich taste. When smoked, the embers have an even glow and enter the body smoothly. When vaporized, there should be no apparent “green” taste.

If flower buds are dried too quickly, chlorophyll and other pigments, starch and nitrates or other fertilizer salts are trapped within plant tissue, making it burn unevenly and taste unpleasantly “green.” If buds are dried too slow, or not at all, they rot.

Gardeners can lose some or all of their crop to poor drying and curing. Here’s how to do it right:

Drying

Drying converts 75% or more of a freshly harvested plant into water vapor and other gases and converts carbohydrates to simple sugars. Drying also converts chlorophyll and other pigments so that no “green” residuals remain.

You can harvest an entire plant, individual branches or strip flower buds from branches to dry. When stems are severed, the transport of fluids within the plant continues, but at a much slower rate. The natural plant processes slowly come to an end as the plant dries. The outer cells are the first to dry, but fluid still moves from internal cells to supply moisture to outer cells, which are dry. When the drying and curing processes occur properly, plants dry evenly throughout. Removing leaves and large stems upon harvest speeds drying; however, moisture content within the “dried” flower buds, leaves and stems can become uneven.

Drying time depends upon temperature, humidity and bud density. Ideal temperature is 60-70°F and the best humidity range for drying is 45-55%. Most flower buds will be dry enough in three to five days before passing to the curing process, but they may take longer. It can take up to two weeks before all chlorophyll — the stuff that gives the “green” taste — has dissipated from foliage. Big, fat, dense flower buds can take three to four days longer to dry than smaller buds. Gently squeeze buds after they have been drying for a few days to check for moisture content. Bend stems to see if they are dry. If the stem breaks rather than folds, it is ready to cure. The bud should be dry to the touch but not brittle. The bud should burn well enough to smoke when dry.

Curing

Even after plants, branches or buds have dried on screens or been suspended in a drying room for five to seven days and appear to be dry, they still contain moisture inside. This moisture affects taste, fragrance and cannabinoid content (potency). Curing will remove this excess moisture and all it contains.

Curing makes buds uniformly dry and pleasant to consume, and preserves natural cannabinoids and terpenes. Curing after drying helps remove any remaining chlorophyll, other pigments, latent fertilizer salts and so on that have accumulated in flower buds, leaves and stems. If dried too quickly, flower buds retain more chlorophyll and have a “green” taste, and when vaporized or smoked are harsh on the pallet and often burn too hot. For some, curing is not essential. In fact, some medical patients prefer the often minty flavor of uncured cannabis.

Curing also allows cannabis to fully dry so that mold does not grow when it is stored. Well-cured flower buds are soft and pliable but dry inside. Flower buds should feel like they are dry and only the dry pliable foliage is holding resin onto stems. Here’s how to cure bud:

Gently place “dry” flower buds in an airtight container. Clear and opaque turkey bags are popular. So are food-grade sealable plastic buckets. There are also bags that reflect heat and are airtight (when properly sealed) and infrared-proof, which protects them from heat.

Write the date on the containers and place in a cool, dry, dark place. Moisture inside buds will migrate from the center of the stem outward. Check the container after two to four hours to see if buds feel different. Gently squeeze a couple of buds to see if they feel moister now, but be careful, resin glands bruise easily.

Open the drying container two to three times a day for the first seven days to release moisture. Take a whiff the instant you open the container. The fragrance should be sweet and somewhat moist. Close the container quickly. If necessary, remove buds from jar for a short time to inspect for mold and disease.

After the first week, open containers once or twice a week for a quick whiff. Do not open too many times or the slow-curing process will stop. Some gardeners cure flower buds slowly for six months or longer. However, after two to three weeks they should be fully cured and remain fresh, firm and pliable. Flower buds can be sealed in containers and stored.

Things to Avoid

Light — especially ultraviolet (UV) rays from natural sunlight — heat and friction hasten biodegradation of resin glands and cannabinoids. Do not place dried cannabis in hot automobile glove compartments, and keep it away from heat vents and so forth. Friction and rough handling can bruise and rupture resin glands. Even with proper drying and curing, brutal handling of harvested cannabis will diminish cannabinoid content.

By Jorge Cervantes

Jorge Cervantes is a world-renowned expert on indoor, outdoor and greenhouse cannabis cultivation. His articles, books (“Cannabis Encyclopedia” and “Marijuana Horticulture”) and YouTube videos have helped teach millions of people how to grow top-quality cannabis. Connect with Jorge on his site, marijuanagrowing.com.

You’ve Grown It, Now Own It: How to Master Drying & Curing Cannabis was posted on Cannabis Now.

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